Friday, September22, 2017 L-36.com

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Articles for Boat Owners

Phone or Tablet On Board

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Using phones and tablets for marine applications is very attractive. Applications are a fraction of the cost of dedicated marine products that seem to perform the same function. But the marine environment is very difficult and there are problems with both phone and tablet applications. There are many articles on the Internet showing you which 10 apps are the best. This is not one of those articles.

Starting Apps

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I had intended to review both iRegatta and BC Racer. Both are excellent well done apps for smart phones and tablets.

After testing both, I decided not to review the programs themselves, but to talk about limitations on this class of device. Perhaps you can overcome these limitations but after reading this you will at least you will know what they are.

Starting

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Wouldn't it be great to have an application or device that would get you to the starting line right at the gun going fast. There are several phone/tablet apps that say they will help you do that and a few dedicated boxes that say they will do it better.

This is the first of a series of articles on using GPS devices to get to the line on time going fast.

No Shackle Halyard

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A simple and easy to use method of attaching a halyard to the head of a mainsail is shown. There are no parts to drop or complicated things to do. The toggle is permanently attached to the halyard and a simple trick makes it all work.

Vang Systems

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A 8:1 Vang system that is cheaper than using two fiddle blocks, lighter, and stronger. What is not to like?

The second vang system shows is the 20:1 vang on Papoose. This is a unique system with some advantages that are discussed.

This page also has a link to 16 standard variations on vang systems.

Evantide Sails Again

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L-36 Eventide returned to the Bay on New Year's Day 2012 after our very well photographed adventures at the 2011 Master Mariners Race. Her hull had basically been sawed through from deck to just above the water line by the other boat's chain link bobstay, and her spruce mast and boom were shattered into multiple pieces beyond repair.

Easy GPS Waypoints and Routes Creation

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Wouldn't it be great to just have a list of all the marks in the area and just check them off, rename them to match the names the race committee uses, import them into a program, copy and paste the race committee routes onto a page and press a button and have a file you could download into your GPS? So I built just that.

Gross Fine Mainblock Reeving

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Two ways of reeving the mainsheet in this gross fine mainsheet system are shown. One way avoids the problem of the lines hitting each other.

Finding Target Boat Speed to Windward

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This is a series of web pages designed to allow you to find target boat speeds without fancy instruments. Target boat speed is the speed that will take you upwind as fast as possible.

Bonding Sinks Boat

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Lightning strikes a boat with a bonded through hull and it sinks in an hour. See the photographic proof in this short article. Be sure to read the "Bonding Your Boat"

Inhaulers

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An inhauler, sometimes called a Barberhauler, is used to pull the jib sheets inboard from their normal position. You can do that to decrease the sheeting angle or to keep the sheeting angle the same as you let the sheets out to add fullness.

Calibrating your Knot Meter

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In many area calibrating a Knot Meter is a simple matter of setting it to read what the GPS reads. But if your boat is in areas where there are tides, local current can make this method inaccurate.

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Disclaimer:
The information on this web site has not been checked for accuracy. It is for entertainment purposes only and should be independently verified before using for any other reason. There are five sources. 1) Documents and manuals from a variety of sources. These have not been checked for accuracy and in many cases have not even been read by anyone associated with L-36.com. I have no idea of they are useful or accurate, I leave that to the reader. 2) Articles others have written and submitted. If you have questions on these, please contact the author. 3) Articles that represent my personal opinions. These are intended to promote thought and for entertainment. These are not intended to be fact, they are my opinions. 4) Small programs that generate result presented on a web page. Like any computer program, these may and in some cases do have errors. Almost all of these also make simplifying assumptions so they are not totally accurate even if there are no errors. Please verify all results. 5) Weather information is from numerious of sources and is presented automatically. It is not checked for accuracy either by anyone at L-36.com or by the source which is typically the US Government. See the NOAA web site for their disclaimer. Finally, tide and current data on this site is from 2007 and 2008 data bases, which may contain even older data. Changes in harbors due to building or dredging change tides and currents and for that reason many of the locations presented are no longer supported by newer data bases. For example, there is very little tidal current data in newer data bases so current data is likely wrong to some extent. This data is NOT FOR NAVIGATION. See the XTide disclaimer for details. In addition, tide and current are influenced by storms, river flow, and other factors beyond the ability of any predictive program.