Tuesday, August21, 2018 L-36.com

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My harbor early one morning




Soft Halyard or Line Shackle


soft_halyard_and_stopper_loop

I am calling this a soft halyard or line shackle as it is certainly not confined to use only on halyards. It is a combined splice-shackle and is similar to a soft shackle where the opening eye is on the line and the knot is on a second piece. It is much faster to use than a soft shackle. In applications where the line is 12 strand spectra such as Amsteel, this is a perfect fit. I have tested it to destruction and the failure was similar to other tests of soft shackles which broke at the diamond knot. Based on all these tests, my conclusion is that it is 80-90% as strong as the line. I must add, the force I put on my 1/8 inch Amsteel using a hydraulic jack was huge, many times the force I got using a Barient 22 winch even with 1/8 inch line. In other words, this is a strong, easy to use shackle is integrated into a line such as a halyard. The line in all these photographs is 3/16 Amsteel Blue.


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The headline reads:

Lightning strikes a boat in Wisconsin and the boat sinks in less than an hour......

On Wednesday, June 8th, 2011 as the sailboat fleets made their way in from the evening races, they were glad to beat the thunderstorm that was coming in from the west. Just at dusk eye witnesses saw a lightning bolt hit a 30 ft ketch swinging on a mooring in McKinley harbor, downtown Milwaukee. " It lit up like a Christmas tree" was how one observer described the event. Within an hour the boat was under water with just portions of the masts showing.

Through Hull and Bonding

Notice the wire going to the through hull in the picture below. Also notice the grounding clamp around the through hull where the connection was made.
151000-boat-strike-2
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Bonding and Corrosion

There are few if any topics in yachting that have as much myth and misinformation surrounding them as does the question of bonding various pieces of your boat together. There is a very good reason for this confusion as the requirements surrounding bonding conflict. It is important to understand when bonding is good and when it is bad so that you can know when you should and when you should not bond. I hope this article will help to clear up some of that confusion. I will try and present the topic in an understandable way so that you can make decisions based on knowledge rather than on opinion or myth.

The "big picture" questions that need to be answered are:

  1. What does bonding actually do?
  2. Why do you want to bond pieces of your boat together?
  3. Why do you want to have pieces of your boat isolated (not bonded)?

If we can answer these questions we can make intelligent decisions about what to do.

What does bonding actually do?


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tp52s
Two TP-52s




Inhauler

An inhauler, sometimes called a Barberhauler, is used to pull the jib sheets inboard from their normal position. You can do that to decrease the sheeting angle or to keep the sheeting angle the same as you let the sheets out to add fullness. We do that when we need more power to drive through the waves. In flat water, we don't use it so we like to have it detachable and easily set up. This setup stores nicely and can be quickly installed on the already set sail. The carabiners I use are very light so they do not harm the paint on the deck. Them and the descending ring are from REI and their 5,000 pound rating, typical of climbing equipment, is ideal for my boat. Get the carabiners with the wire gates.

This is generation 3 of my inhauler setup. It is easier to set up than the other versions. The 8:1 purchase seems ideal for the job and the fact that one control line works both port and starboard is a great advantage. Once balanced, you are automatically maintain your trim after a tack. I like to rig my double block so the line is against the deck instead of the face. You can see that in the pictures below.
inhauler


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Knot Meter Calibration

In many area calibrating a Knot Meter is a simple matter of setting it to read what the GPS reads. But if your boat is in areas where there are tides, local current can make this method inaccurate. The following method can be used to calibrate a knot meter even if there are very strong currents.
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Samba Pa Ti and GG Bridge




Over 200 Marine Manuals

Listed Alphabetically
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sailboat rig dimensions

Boat Dimensions

BOAT
I
J
P
E
ISP
JSP
PY
EY
Lapworth 36 40.5 13.5 35.5 17.5

Click Here for other boat types
Sail Area Calculations
Mainsail = (P x E) / 2 = 311 sq ft
155% Genoa = (( J x I ) / 2) x 1.65 = 451 sq ft
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sailing2
Two Melgeis 32's on split tacks heading to the windward mark

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Disclaimer:
The information on this web site has not been checked for accuracy. It is for entertainment purposes only and should be independently verified before using for any other reason. There are five sources. 1) Documents and manuals from a variety of sources. These have not been checked for accuracy and in many cases have not even been read by anyone associated with L-36.com. I have no idea of they are useful or accurate, I leave that to the reader. 2) Articles others have written and submitted. If you have questions on these, please contact the author. 3) Articles that represent my personal opinions. These are intended to promote thought and for entertainment. These are not intended to be fact, they are my opinions. 4) Small programs that generate result presented on a web page. Like any computer program, these may and in some cases do have errors. Almost all of these also make simplifying assumptions so they are not totally accurate even if there are no errors. Please verify all results. 5) Weather information is from numerious of sources and is presented automatically. It is not checked for accuracy either by anyone at L-36.com or by the source which is typically the US Government. See the NOAA web site for their disclaimer. Finally, tide and current data on this site is from 2007 and 2008 data bases, which may contain even older data. Changes in harbors due to building or dredging change tides and currents and for that reason many of the locations presented are no longer supported by newer data bases. For example, there is very little tidal current data in newer data bases so current data is likely wrong to some extent. This data is NOT FOR NAVIGATION. See the XTide disclaimer for details. In addition, tide and current are influenced by storms, river flow, and other factors beyond the ability of any predictive program.