Friday, August14, 2020
Privacy Policy
L-36.com


Marine Weather and Tides
Inez, KY

Version 3.4
NOTICE
12/16/2019 NOAA is having trouble with requests that include wind gusts. I am posting graphs without wind gusts until it gets fixed.
10/9/2019 Updated the Marine Zones.
9/4/2019 Fixed the weather maps due to NOAA moving them.
7/25/2019 New feature in the Airports section gives a link to 5 minute updates for data reports.

Sunrise 6:42AMSunset 8:26PM Friday August 14, 2020 3:54 AM EDT (07:54 UTC) Moonrise 1:03AMMoonset 4:08PM Illumination 21% Phase: Waning Crescent; Moon at 25 days in cycle
NOTE: Some of the data on this page has not been verified and should be used with that in mind. It may and occasionally will, be wrong. The tide reports are by xtide and are NOT FOR NAVIGATION.
Marine Forecasts
    EDIT      (on/off)   Help


7 Day Forecast for Marine Location Near Inez, KY
   Hourly   EDIT   Help
location: 37.92, -82.66     debug


Area Discussion for - Jackson, KY
      (on/off)   Help   NOTE: mouseover dotted underlined text for definition
FXUS63 KJKL 140701 AFDJKL

AREA FORECAST DISCUSSION National Weather Service Jackson KY 301 AM EDT Fri Aug 14 2020

UPDATE. Issued at 300 AM EDT FRI AUG 14 2020

Isolated shower development has occurred over the northern portion of the forecast area, and a slight chance POP has been extended in that area through the night.

UPDATE Issued at 1055 PM EDT THU AUG 13 2020

Went ahead and updated the grids to remove the thunder through the night. Cannot rule it out completely but the chances are less than 10 percent for any location in eastern Kentucky. That said we will still have to watch any outflows or development easing this way from western West Virginia - which none of the CAMs are handling at all. After an active evening a quiet night will ensue, but areas of fog - locally dense - can be expected hitting the river valleys, and places that saw the evening rains, hardest. With this update also included the current obs and trends for the Sky/T/Td grids. These updates have been sent to the NDFD and web servers along with a freshened set of text zones, HWO, and SAF.

UPDATE Issued at 800 PM EDT THU AUG 13 2020

23z sfc analysis shows eastern Kentucky still mostly south of a larger synoptic front running west to east near the Ohio River. This is keeping the airmass warm and humid - primed for convection to develop and be sustained. In addition, weak flow aloft is leading to very slow storm movement. In fact, for a time the redevelopment in the east was running along the direction of the stream flow of many of the creeks in Pike County heightening the risk for localized flooding there. Now these storms are starting to fade for most of the area and moving out of the locations of higher concern. Look for the activity to settle down in the next few hours as the instability wanes with sunset. The PoP and Wx grids were updated per the radar trends and the NAMNest near term simulated radar guidance. Temperatures are running in the upper 70s to low 80s for most places, but in the upper 60s and lower 70s where it is raining or just recently saw a storm. Dewpoints, meanwhile, are elevated in the low to mid 70s making for a steamy early evening. Winds, outside of any storms, have been light and variable and will continue that way. Have updated the T/Td grids with the latest obs and trends as well as tweaking the fog for the night considering where the rain has fallen in addition to our typical river valley spots. These updates have been sent to the NDFD and web servers. Look for an update to the text zones and HWO once the storms are gone for the evening.

SHORT TERM. (This evening through Friday night) Issued at 455 PM EDT THU AUG 13 2020

An upper level low/trough continues to meander across the Lower OH Valley. This was located with a general upper level weakness/upper level trough that extended from the OH Valley into the southeast between an upper level ridge centered near Bermuda and another upper level ridge centered in the Southern Rockies. Meanwhile, a stalled out boundary remains across the OH Valley region near the OH River, though there is a sfc trough/moisture boundary that extends south near or just west of I 75 and then across east TN where it is less defined and then northeast into the central Appalachians. Coverage of convection has been greatest from central KY into the southwest part of the CWA and then into east TN as well as southeast of the area over southwest VA and southern WV. Isolated to scattered showers have developed over the region, but with rather weak forcing and shear have dissipated rather quickly despite modest instability. Relatively warm mid level temperatures and mid level lapse rates around 5.5 C/km seem to be a limiting factor despite low level lapse rates of 7 to 8 C/km and a moist airmass in place with PW of about 1.5 to 1.75 inches.

Recent trends/mesoanalysis and convective allowing models support the greatest coverage of convection through this evening in the southeast and southwest portions of the area where MLCAPE is closer to 1500 J/kg versus 1000 J/kg. What storms that develop will be slow moving and at least any storm mergers or outflow interactions could lead to multiple cells and locally heavier rain. Convection should largely wane within a couple of hour past sunset as the upper low/trough remain in place across the lower OH Valley. PW will also gradually increase tonight with the moisture gradient residing near southwest portion of the area. Thus, some convection cannot be ruled out, especially later tonight in the west and north near the stalled boundary/moisture boundary, as the upper low/trough begins to move slowly east in response to a quicker shortwave trough moving along the US/Canadian border and into the Northern Plains. With the anticipated wane in convection, some partial clearing or breaks in the clouds should occur and valley fog and perhaps some stratus in the southeast. Some dense fog is certainly possible, especially for valley locations where breaks in the clouds are most persistent and near where heavier rain falls through this evening.

Any fog should dissipate by 9 or 10 AM EDT on Friday. Then, a diurnal increase in convection is anticipated, especially across the south and west as the upper low/trough continues a slow trek east. PW of 1.6 to 1.9 is anticipated and convection should be rather slow moving once again. As has been the case across the Appalachians and OH Valley over the past couple of days, rather high freezing levels should contribute to heavy rainfall rates and any storm interactions/outflow interactions could result in some training of cells. Coverage of convection should be greater than the fast few days. Some of the recent convective allowing models have signals or bullseyes of up to 3 inches or so of rainfall in a rather short period indicative of the potential for locally heavy rainfall and the threat of flooding. This threat continues to be highlighted in the HWO.

The upper low/trough will move further east on Friday night with the deeper moisture/higher PW air lingering longest in the east. Showers and isolated storms should linger into the night, with these lingering longest in the eastern portions of the area. Some stratus build down or fog may also develop. The threat for showers and storms that could train will linger on Friday night as PW at least early in the night will be nearing 2 inches. This threat continues to be highlighted in the HWO.

LONG TERM. (Saturday through Thursday) Issued at 520 PM EDT THU AUG 13 2020

Locally heavy showers and thunderstorms wind down on Saturday and a Canadian cold front follows early next week, ushering in a cooler and less humid weather pattern for most of next week. The models remain in broad agreement through the extended. An expansive ~596 dam high will be centered over Arizona Saturday morning while a strong upper level trough extends from the Canadian Arctic to the upper Mississippi Valley. The flow around these large systems will split over the upper Ohio Valley and eastern Great Lakes, resulting in narrow ridging extending northward into the Quebec and broader troughing over the Southeast US. This will allow a weak upper level low to pass over the Ohio Valley on Saturday. This system fills and lifts away from the region on Sunday while the northern trough digs into the eastern CONUS and the western ridge strengthens/retrogrades to near the Great Basin.

Ongoing convection is expected across east Kentucky Saturday morning as a weak surface low, mirroring the weak low aloft, rides along a frontal boundary draped across the Commonwealth. A weak cool front, along the back side of the of the low, is expected to slowly push east across the CWA through the day ushering in drier air and bringing widespread rainfall to an end as it passes. There will still be a threat for localized hydro issues east of this boundary, particularly over Pike and adjoining counties, where the highest PWATs will combine with slow storm motions, warm rain processes, and tall, skinny CAPE to to potentially produce torrential downpours through much of the afternoon. Shortwave ridging and weak surface high pressure nose in behind the front Saturday night. Our focus then turns to the digging northern trough which will support a cold front diving into the Ohio Valley on Sunday, reaching eastern Kentucky during the evening or overnight. The front’s relatively quick movement and the lack of deep moisture should limit the duration and intensity of any associated convection. Behind that front, 850 temps are expected to fall back into the 14-16C range on Monday afternoon. Another moisture-starved front could pivot through the area Monday night/Tuesday further suppressing 850 temps. The front stalls east of the area mid-week and becomes a focus point for convection Wednesday and Thursday, especially along and east of the Appalachians.

Numerous to widespread showers are forecast to be ongoing Saturday morning but should gradually diminish from west to east during the afternoon and evening. The greatest threat for any torrential downpours and localized flooding issues will likely coincide with peak daytime destabilization across far eastern Kentucky. High temps will probably be suppressed in the upper 70s to lower 80s, coolest in the east where the clouds and rainfall are most persistent. Any leftover showers are expected to give way to partly cloudy skies Saturday night as drier air and surface high pressure noses into eastern KY. Given the widespread rainfall and favorable radiational cooling, expect areas of valley fog to develop Saturday night and early Sunday morning. The approaching cold front will bring the renewed threat for scattered showers or storms by Sunday afternoon. Slightly cooler and less humid conditions are expected behind this front Monday and especially Tuesday. A stray shower or storm can’t be ruled out either day, particularly over the higher terrain, but most areas should remain dry. Better rain chances are expected over eastern areas mid-week as disturbances ride along the stalled front. Temperatures will cool to below normal for Tuesday and Wednesday with highs in the upper 70s/lower 80s and lows in the upper 50s/lower 60s.

AVIATION. (For the 06Z TAFS through 06Z Friday night) ISSUED AT 300 AM EDT FRI AUG 14 2020

Conditions varied greatly at the start of the period, from VFR to IFR. The worst conditions were more concentrated over the Cumberland Basin and far southeast KY. A further deterioration is forecast, with most places sinking to MVFR or IFR by dawn. Improvement is expected during the morning, with mainly VFR conditions returning. Showers and thunderstorms will increase in coverage as heating occurs. Most places will probably be affected at some point in the afternoon or early evening. However, there is very little confidence in timing for specific locations, and just VCTS has been used in TAFs. Activity should largely die out in the evening, but it may set the stage for fog or low clouds to develop earlier during the night.

JKL WATCHES/WARNINGS/ADVISORIES. NONE.

UPDATE . HAL/GREIF SHORT TERM . JP LONG TERM . GEERTSON AVIATION . HAL


Weather Reporting Stations
   EDIT       (on/off)   Help   NOTE: Click on distance to see the station location on a map

Airport Reports
    EDIT      (on/off)   Help   Click EDIT to display multiple airports. Follow links for more data.
AirportDistAgeWind ktVisibilitySky/WeatherTempDewPtHumidityPressure
Huntington, Tri-State Airport, WV32 mi64 minSW 510.00 miA Few Clouds71°F70°F96%1013.4 hPa

Link to 5 minute data for KHTS

Wind History from HTS (wind in knots)
4
AM
5
AM
6
AM
7
AM
8
AM
9
AM
10
AM
11
AM
12
PM
1
PM
2
PM
3
PM
4
PM
5
PM
6
PM
7
PM
8
PM
9
PM
10
PM
11
PM
12
AM
1
AM
2
AM
3
AM
Last 24hrSE3CalmCalmCalmN3E3CalmCalmCalmCalmSW6N4N6NE7CalmE3CalmSE3S6CalmS4CalmSE5SW5
1 day agoCalmCalmCalmCalmCalmCalmN4N54SE54CalmN5N8NE4N4NE3NE3CalmCalmSE5CalmCalmE3
2 days agoSW6S7W3NW3NW4CalmCalmCalmNW4NW6N33E3N6--CalmNE3N3CalmCalmCalmCalmNE3Calm

Tide / Current Tables for
   EDIT   Weekend mode (on/off)   (on/off)   Help
Tide / Current Tables for
   EDIT      (on/off)   Help
Weather Map
       (on/off)   Help Weather Map
wmap_A
GEOS Local Image of    EDIT
NOTE: East coast views moved to GEOS-16. They are experimental and not well supported by NOAA so they may not be correct so be warned. This change required redoing a large amount of the GOES code. If the image you are expecting is not showing, please let me know. You may need to use the EDIT function to update your location.
Link to Loop

Other links: Northern Pacific     Contential US     Full GOES-East
Wind Forecast for Jackson, KY (3,6,7,8)
      (on/off)   Help

Ground Weather Radar Station Charleston, WV
   (on/off)   Help
weather_mapweather_map weather_map

Ad by Google

Cookie Policy:
This website uses cookies to save your settings. No personal information is saved. I do not collect statistics on your visit. You can disable cookies in your browser if you like but it is not recommended for this site. I do not sell cookies. Go to a bakery for that. In fact I do not sell anything. To disable cookies from L-36.com, please refer to the Help button in your browser.
Privacy Policy:
I do not sell or share any user data or anything else for that matter. The only personal information I save is in the site log which has a line for each page view which includes the IP address your browser sends in the header as well as which page you requested. I use this to block hackers and other bad actors. I do not use this raw data to create profiles on users. I periodically delete the log files. If you are subject to CCPA, Google ads on this site will not be based on your past behavior so you will likely not see an ad for a lawn mower just because you looked for one at a big box website. I do not believe this site is subject to CCPA but I am doing what I can to follow the guidelines anyway.
Disclaimer:
The information on this web site has not been checked for accuracy. It is for entertainment purposes only and should be independently verified before using for any other reason. There are five sources. 1) Documents and manuals from a variety of sources. These have not been checked for accuracy and in many cases have not even been read by anyone associated with L-36.com. I have no idea of they are useful or accurate, I leave that to the reader. 2) Articles others have written and submitted. If you have questions on these, please contact the author. 3) Articles that represent my personal opinions. These are intended to promote thought and for entertainment. These are not intended to be fact, they are my opinions. 4) Small programs that generate result presented on a web page. Like any computer program, these may and in some cases do have errors. Almost all of these also make simplifying assumptions so they are not totally accurate even if there are no errors. Please verify all results. 5) Weather information is from numerous of sources and is presented automatically. It is not checked for accuracy either by anyone at L-36.com or by the source which is typically the US Government. See the NOAA web site for their disclaimer. Finally, tide and current data on this site is from 2007 and 2008 data bases, which may contain even older data. Changes in harbors due to building or dredging change tides and currents and for that reason many of the locations presented are no longer supported by newer data bases. For example, there is very little tidal current data in newer data bases so current data is likely wrong to some extent. This data is NOT FOR NAVIGATION. See the XTide disclaimer for details. In addition, tide and current are influenced by storms, river flow, and other factors beyond the ability of any predictive program.